The Vermont 100 Endurance Race is one of the original 100 mile runs in the USA and a part of the Grand Slam Series of Ultrarunning. Each year, 300 runners attempt to finish this hilly race over beautiful Vermont back roads and trails under the 30 hour cutoff point, and a well-trained few finish in under 24 hours.

27th Annual Race
July 18-19, 2015

RunReg.com

100 mi and 100K Are Full!

Wait Lists ARE OPEN

Check Your Registration and Wait List Info: HERE

Monday, July 6, 2015

A Note from Our Race Director #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

 PLEASE SHARE THIS POST WITH YOUR CREWS!!!

Dear VT 100 Participants,
Today's update is about FRIDAY REGISTRATION:

Directions and Maps
YOU WILL ALL NEED THE ATTACHED ID PAGE TO ACCESS SILVER HILL. Print it and place it on your dash when you are driving to Silver Hill. Make sure that your crews, pacers, family, etc all have this page for their dashes.

(This does not give you access to aid stations, just Silver Hill.)

There will be many "closed" roads on the way to Silver Hill and you and your crews must stay off of them. Any road with a sign reading "closed to event traffic" "Local traffic only" "closed to through traffic" or "NO VT 100" is off limits to our event. Check for directions here:
http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/directions.html.
The future of our event depends 
on everyone 
staying off closed roads!

Please remember that on any unmarked DIRT road in Vermont, the speed limit is 35mph. Silver Hill is very skinny and has lots of corners. Please drive slowly for everyone's safety!

When driving and parking at our Silver Hill site, please remember these things: 

Always obey the signs!

Never park in the road!

Always enter up and drive down in parking areas.
All of our parking is in grassy fields. With any amount of rain, they can become very slick and then very muddy.
Every field has an entrance at the TOP and an exit at the BOTTOM.

Stay out of the mud!! The mud is deeper than you think here! If it rains and mud appears in the field, do not drive in it. You will get stuck and make it worse. Go around!

REGISTRATION WILL TAKE LONGER THAN USUAL.

YOU need to pick up your packet and check in with medical (weight, blood pressure and a chat) BEFORE the 4pm runners meeting.

YOUR CREW needs to register their vehicle. They can do this while you are in line for packet pick up or med check. All they need is to know your bib number. Crew Vehicle Registration will be in the field across Silver Hill Rd from the main tent. Watch for the signs as you drive down Silver Hill. During registration, we will:

· Mark the crew car with your runners bib number

· Give the crew an official dash plaque for AID STATION ACCESS

· Give the crew directions to the aid stations

· Take note of the crew car make, model and license plate number

· Take note of the name and a cell phone number of someone in the crew

Crews will not be allowed to park in the aid stations if their car is not marked.
Crews will not be given directions to the aid stations if they do not register your car.
(You can speed up the crew registration process by entering the necessary information at the 'Crew Vehicle Registration' at
https://www.runreg.com/vermont-100-endurance-race-vt-101  prior to July 13th.)
If your crew requires alternative directions (i.e. they will be skipping Pretty House and want to go directly to Stage Road), they can get these by talking to a race official - they will need to show the crew vehicle plaque to obtain these directions.

CREWS PLEASE VISIT THIS PAGE FOR YOUR COMPLETE RULES AND PROCEDURES:
http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/handler-rules.html

Also, we suggest that crews bring a head lamp and an additional flashlight for reading the handler directions and following reflective signs.

And bug spray, lots and lots of bug spray!

We open for registration at 10am, come as early as you can and enjoy VT if you have extra time.

The Brownsville General Store is only a few miles from Silver Hill and they have a great deli for lunch time!

As always, feel free to e-mail with questions!
Amy Rusiecki
VT 100 RD
vt100@vermontadaptive.org

Meet VT100 Charity Runners-Adolfo Munguia Castilla #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Adolfo Munguia Castilla
How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
I have been running ultra’s for a couple years. I have attempted and finished 6 ultra’s: Cayuga Trails 50 mile, Finger Lakes 50 mile, GLER 100k, NYRR 60k (twice), and the North Face Endurance Challenge at Bear Mt. in NY. Hopefully it’s the beginning of many years and races ahead of me.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
It was relatively close to get to, I have heard many great things about the race, and it’s in the summer time. Also, in terms of dreams, it a qualifier for the Western States…

How is training going so far this year?
It’s been strange. I got a part in Creative Time’s art project in Central Park, and every weekend was pretending to be Dustin Hoffman in The Marathon Man from 12-6. Got a lot of miles in, but pretty flat.
What are your favorite and least favorite aspects to a 100 miler?
Ask me after the race… this is my first time attempting 100 miles!

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
Have fun. Don’t think, just run. At some point you’re going to finish, don’t worry about it. It’s just a few hours of your life.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon?
So many. Every race is a great experience with crazy adventures attached. But probably Cayuga Trails 50 – because it was my first race, first time ever on a trail, in a mountain, and I had no idea about the vertical map of the race. Everything was a beautiful difficult surprise.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Meet Our Charity Runner-Chip Paterson #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Chip Paterson
How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
I ran my first ultra in 2008- it was the 50k at the VT50. It was actually sort of an accident. I had biked the VT50 for a number of years and talked a few co-workers into signing up. Unfortunately I spaced out and missed the sign up myself. These co-workers weren’t very happy about that and told me I better start running because they were going to make me go and run the 50k. Up to that point the longest run I had ever been on was about 12 miles. Since then I have run a number of 50ks, 50 milers and other assorted races.

Have you run the Vermont 100 before? If yes, when?
I started in 2010 but dropped at 75 miles for no good reason. I finished VT100 in 2011 and again in 2013.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
I’d like to have a more confident finish, and am hopeful for sub 24-hour. I hope I didn’t just jinx myself by saying that out loud.

How is training going so far this year?
It’s going well. I feel stronger at this point than in past years I think.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
I first learned of VASS when I rode my first VT50 in 2003. I am thrilled to be giving something more back to the organization this year for the opportunity to participate in the VT100 and would like to volunteer with VASS in the future.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Meet Our Charity Runner-Celia Leber #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Celia Leber

How long have you been running ultra marathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
My first trail marathon was around 1990 - I had run a lot of shorter trail races and some road marathons at that point and wanted to try a longer trail race. After that I ran a bunch of trail races in the 20-26 mile range in the early 90's, then ran my first 50 miler in 1999 (the Vermont 50). I finished that one just over the official time limit. I ran a bunch of trail ultras, from 50K to 100 miles, from 2000 to 2005, mostly in New England, with a few in CA and OR. Then I took a break for a few years to focus more on cycling, in part due to plantar fasciitis issues. According to UltraSignup I've done 36 ultras, but I think it's probably closer to 40-45 since a few didn't get on there.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
When I crossed the line last year, an old friend who was at the finish said "gee, I think 24 hours is within your grasp!" So although I had been thinking about trying a different 100 miler I decided to come back to Vermont and try for a buckle. And I love the race!

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
I have tremendous loyalty and affection for VASS. My husband and I have been taking part, either running or biking, in the Vermont 50 since shortly after we got married (I think we have done it something like 14 times?) Some of my happiest hours have been spent on the VT50 or VT100 course. Mike Silverman is great, the volunteers are great -- I feel like it's a big extended family. So, VASS is a great cause that does good work, but I think for me it's more a matter of wanting to pay back for all that the VASS events have meant to me over the years.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations?
Probably seeing my crew - my friends Beth and Doug took such good care of me last year. And I like having chicken soup at the aid stations at night. Oh, and Coke - ultras are really the only time I drink soda at all, but during the race I will swig down a lot of Coke and ginger ale.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon?
 The first time I ran the VT50 with my best friend Penny, we were at the back of the pack at about 40 miles, when we passed a parked pick up truck with some hunters sitting in the truck bed. "Want a beer, ladies?" We looked at each other, pondering the question. "All those folks may be ahead of you, but if you have a beer now then at the finish you'll know you're one ahead of them!" We all laughed at that one, and Penny and I happily shared a bottle of Michelob as we continued on up the road.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Meet Our Charity Runner-Jeff Whittingham #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Jeff Whittingham

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
This is my second year running ultra distances (and 2nd year running since college xc 18yrs ago). However, I’ve been doing ultra distance mountain bike races for nearly 15 years, with fairly good results (a number of podium finishes at solo 24hr races, some top 10’s at 100 milers (NUE Series races), won the VT50, etc.

A few years ago they started a marathon in my town (the Mad Marathon) and it seemed fitting to give it a go as it meanders past my house. I did well enough to qualify for Boston, then that fall ran the VT50 in a respectable time (around 8hrs). I then decided to give a 100 a go as I really enjoy ultra distance efforts and doing 100 miles by foot has an allure that I can’t shake.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
I’m a Vermonter and have done the VT50 7-8 times by bike and once by foot. I love the course and that the event 100% supports VT Adaptive. Living in the Mad River Valley I’ve found both the volunteers and athletes participating in VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring, much more so than us silly folks running or riding all day.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
For similar reasons that drove me to choose the VT100 as my first ultra. I find the volunteers and athletes of VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring. I’ve probably done 50 ultra distance events over the past 15 years and they’ve always been for selfish reasons. For me, 100 miles is a challenge unlike any other. Riding for 24 hours was hard, but you glide down hill, in running there is no respite. In thinking about this challenge, I wanted to do it for more than myself – a true testament to the human spirit – and the courage of those for whom just getting outside is a true challenge.

What is your fundraising goal?
It was originally $1000, but once I crossed that barrier I upped it to $2000. I have a few hundred to go and am looking to do at least one more fundraising push before the race in order to get there (or close to it).

What is your incentive for fundraising and what strategies have worked so far in raising money?
The incentive is seeing VT Adaptive in action at Mt Ellen and how much equipment is required to get some folks out there on the slopes – and realizing this is just one sport VT Adaptive is engaged in.



More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.