The Vermont 100 Endurance Race is one of the original 100 mile runs in the USA and a part of the Grand Slam Series of Ultrarunning. Each year, 300 runners attempt to finish this hilly race over beautiful Vermont back roads and trails under the 30 hour cutoff point, and a well-trained few finish in under 24 hours.

27th Annual Race
July 18-19, 2015

RunReg.com

100 mi and 100K Are Full!

Wait Lists ARE OPEN

Check Your Registration and Wait List Info: HERE

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Meet Our Charity Runner-Celia Leber #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Celia Leber

How long have you been running ultra marathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
My first trail marathon was around 1990 - I had run a lot of shorter trail races and some road marathons at that point and wanted to try a longer trail race. After that I ran a bunch of trail races in the 20-26 mile range in the early 90's, then ran my first 50 miler in 1999 (the Vermont 50). I finished that one just over the official time limit. I ran a bunch of trail ultras, from 50K to 100 miles, from 2000 to 2005, mostly in New England, with a few in CA and OR. Then I took a break for a few years to focus more on cycling, in part due to plantar fasciitis issues. According to UltraSignup I've done 36 ultras, but I think it's probably closer to 40-45 since a few didn't get on there.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
When I crossed the line last year, an old friend who was at the finish said "gee, I think 24 hours is within your grasp!" So although I had been thinking about trying a different 100 miler I decided to come back to Vermont and try for a buckle. And I love the race!

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
I have tremendous loyalty and affection for VASS. My husband and I have been taking part, either running or biking, in the Vermont 50 since shortly after we got married (I think we have done it something like 14 times?) Some of my happiest hours have been spent on the VT50 or VT100 course. Mike Silverman is great, the volunteers are great -- I feel like it's a big extended family. So, VASS is a great cause that does good work, but I think for me it's more a matter of wanting to pay back for all that the VASS events have meant to me over the years.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations?
Probably seeing my crew - my friends Beth and Doug took such good care of me last year. And I like having chicken soup at the aid stations at night. Oh, and Coke - ultras are really the only time I drink soda at all, but during the race I will swig down a lot of Coke and ginger ale.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon?
 The first time I ran the VT50 with my best friend Penny, we were at the back of the pack at about 40 miles, when we passed a parked pick up truck with some hunters sitting in the truck bed. "Want a beer, ladies?" We looked at each other, pondering the question. "All those folks may be ahead of you, but if you have a beer now then at the finish you'll know you're one ahead of them!" We all laughed at that one, and Penny and I happily shared a bottle of Michelob as we continued on up the road.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Meet Our Charity Runner-Jeff Whittingham #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Jeff Whittingham

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
This is my second year running ultra distances (and 2nd year running since college xc 18yrs ago). However, I’ve been doing ultra distance mountain bike races for nearly 15 years, with fairly good results (a number of podium finishes at solo 24hr races, some top 10’s at 100 milers (NUE Series races), won the VT50, etc.

A few years ago they started a marathon in my town (the Mad Marathon) and it seemed fitting to give it a go as it meanders past my house. I did well enough to qualify for Boston, then that fall ran the VT50 in a respectable time (around 8hrs). I then decided to give a 100 a go as I really enjoy ultra distance efforts and doing 100 miles by foot has an allure that I can’t shake.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
I’m a Vermonter and have done the VT50 7-8 times by bike and once by foot. I love the course and that the event 100% supports VT Adaptive. Living in the Mad River Valley I’ve found both the volunteers and athletes participating in VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring, much more so than us silly folks running or riding all day.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
For similar reasons that drove me to choose the VT100 as my first ultra. I find the volunteers and athletes of VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring. I’ve probably done 50 ultra distance events over the past 15 years and they’ve always been for selfish reasons. For me, 100 miles is a challenge unlike any other. Riding for 24 hours was hard, but you glide down hill, in running there is no respite. In thinking about this challenge, I wanted to do it for more than myself – a true testament to the human spirit – and the courage of those for whom just getting outside is a true challenge.

What is your fundraising goal?
It was originally $1000, but once I crossed that barrier I upped it to $2000. I have a few hundred to go and am looking to do at least one more fundraising push before the race in order to get there (or close to it).

What is your incentive for fundraising and what strategies have worked so far in raising money?
The incentive is seeing VT Adaptive in action at Mt Ellen and how much equipment is required to get some folks out there on the slopes – and realizing this is just one sport VT Adaptive is engaged in.



More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Friday, July 3, 2015

Meet Our Charity Runner-Lucimar Araujo #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015
We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Lucimar Araujo

How did you get involved with ultra running?
I actually ran an ultra marathon before I ran a marathon! I wanted to run the New York City Marathon but couldn't get in, so to prove that I could do it, I ran an ultra. At that point I had only run up to 18 miles. I ran two ultras before finally running the New York City Marathon. I don't remember exactly how many I have done, but I have kept all of my race numbers and made a skirt out of them.

You've chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
My father was a very giving person and I want to follow in his footsteps. He gave back to the community; that is his legacy. I raised money in my first 5k and continue to do so because of him. It makes me feel good to do something like he would do.

What is your fundraising goal?
I believe sports are for everyone and so I've reached out to friends and family to help me while I raise money. I use the letter on my fundraising page. When I got to $1000, I tried for $1500. When I got there, I tried for $2000, and now I'll try for $2500. We'll see how much I can raise!

What are your favorite aspects of the VT 100?
The whole community stops and supports the event. It is beautiful! The hills are a way to challenge myself (even if I don't like hills!).

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
Listen you your body. I encourage all people to run. I love when people who think I'm crazy and then they start and love it. The way I run may motivate someone. People tell me, "I love to see your pictures because you look so happy" and I tell them that anything I can do, you can do better.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Meet Our Charity Runner-Matt Klein #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Thanks to All Our
Charity Runners for 2015

We asked them a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...

Meet Matt Klein


How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?  
I’ve been running ultras for a few years now. Before I started running, I was the poster boy for anyone looking to go to the grave early. I had an addictive personality and was selfish and self-centered. That all changed when my life blew up and I found myself handcuffed to a hospital bed. When I got out and on my feet, I was told that idle hands were the devil’s playground. To that end, I got lucky with an entry into the 2006 NYC marathon and my path towards ultras began. I loved everything about that first race. Which led to more marathons. And those led to half iron man triathlons, which led to full iron man tri-s, which lead to 50Ks and 60Ks and then 100Ks. After that I put my sights on a 100 miler. And then another. And then another…. 
The best is having a bucket list of races that I can work toward over a lifetime.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?

There’s nothing I like more than helping others through running – something I absolutely love to do. It’s my Zen. My meditation. Everything comes out on the run. All of life’s problems seem to solve themselves on the long run. When I learned there were charity spots available, and that I could help the organization that really made an impression on me at last year’s event, it was an easy decision to sign up.

Also, last year a woman and child that benefited from VA spoke at the Friday afternoon meeting under the tent. It was moving and gave me an incredible sense of gratitude to be a part of something so obviously epic.

What also left a deep impression on me was some of the VA folks were BBQ’ing at one of the aid stations on the back half of the race. I might have been 60 or so miles into it. Not exactly sure. They were all having fun and laughing. I can’t tell you what was said to me because I don’t remember. But what I do remember is the great vibe they left me with that carried me toward the end of the race. I often think back to that.  By fundraising, I can help those folks, just as they helped me.

What are your favorite and least favorite aspects to a 100 miler?
Starting with the favorites, it’s the reason I’m coming back to this race – the VOLUNTEERS ARE AWESOME. This race and everybody involved are the best. Volunteers and the race director are what keep people coming back. And the community of ultra-runners that were up here last year were kind and giving of their time and wisdom. It’s the stuff that will bring tears to your eyes if you think on it long enough. Tears of gratitude to have the ability to participate in something so special.

My least favorite aspects - I don’t necessarily like when my stomach goes sour. Which has inevitably happened on every race. Although this year I’m going to try and different approach and see what happens.

I’m a slow and steady guy so that 3 am time frame can be trying also. I’m talking about those moments where I’m begging for the sun to come back. I’m scanning the horizon for any lightening of the sky.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations? Is there a go-to fuel or drink you have? Is it the volunteers? Something else?
I love the variation in the aid stations. But my favorite for food has to be the grand cookie selection at one of the stations. Not quite sure which one. But I’m going to be on the lookout. And I plan on eating more this time around J

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
My advice is pick a race and work toward it. It’s really that simple. You may want to start with a 50k and work your way up. Or you can just shoot the moon and go for the big 100. Either way, make sure you like the training aspect.

I’ve also adopted the idea that every run and race is a lesson of what works and what doesn’t work. And more shall be revealed. You could read all the race reports you want, but until you go out and start putting one foot in front of the other, you’re really not going to understand what is waiting for you.

But I do believe if I can do it, anyone can. Now some people around me have argued that point. But I truly believe if you want it bad enough, you can go out and get it. The discipline of training for this distance spills into all my affairs. I really think it makes me a better son, husband, father, worker and friend. The sense of accomplishment of completing a race like this is unmatched. There’s no parallel. And that’s something that no one can ever take away. It’s with you for life!


More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle.

Happy 4th of July Everyone! #VT1002015 #VT100 #ultrarun #VermontAdaptive #VT #NH

Happy 4th of July

If it's the 4th of July, that can only mean one thing...the 27th Annual Vermont 100 Race is 14 days AWAY!!

We have some very cool people running with us this year...they have chosen to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive and we will be highlighting them over the next few days so stay tuned and meet some fellow runners who have gone above and beyond.

More info about our Top Fundraisers please visit: http://vermont100endurancerun.blogspot.com/p/top-fundraisers.html
Cheers to them and to all of you.
See you in 14 days!