Description

The Vermont 100 Endurance Race is one of the original 100 mile runs in the USA and a part of the Grand Slam Series of Ultrarunning. Each year, 300 runners attempt to finish this hilly race over beautiful Vermont back roads and trails under the 30 hour cutoff point, and a well-trained few finish in under 24 hours. The race proceeds support Vermont Adaptive.

Our Charity Runners

Support Team Run 2 Empower runners

We'll be introducing you to the 2017 Team Run 2 Empower runners Soon!


Meet Our 2016 Charity Runners
https://www.pledgereg.com/91700
As many of you know I run, and sometimes I like to run far. I wanted to sign up for the Vermont 100 mile race. Instead of putting myself on a wait list ( which I was almost sure to get into the race from) I've decided to raise some money for a great charity instead. This way, I get to run the race ( none of the funds I raise go to the race, they ALL go to the charity) Below is a little bit of info about Vermont Ski Adaptive. I hope you can help them out! I hope that by me getting this out there a few more people can get out there and hit the mountain.

Last year VT 100 was able to raise over $30,000 for them. I'm happy to be a part of breaking that number this year!

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!


Greg Cartier
 
I know what it is like to be injured and not know whether or not I will ever be able to ski or experience the outdoors in the same way again. I participated in an adaptive ski program in Colorado the winter after I was injured. It gave me the confidence to get back out there and do what I love to do. Today, I am a professional ski patroller in Vermont. I don't think I'd be in this positiion if it weren't for my experience with the adaptive ski program. For these reasons I have decided that this year I'd run the VT 100 to help support a similiar program, Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports. My hope is that with our contributions others can experience the same success that I did.

Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. Their programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports.
Thank you.

Maria Chevalier
Team Captain- Team WingMan
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I am extremely passionate about which makes the training mean that much more. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge...people who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. Their programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

In 2013 I was matched through the IRun4 group with a wonderful little guy named Nick...he can't run so all of the miles I run are dedicated to him! Nick is an energetic and smart boy who loves Buffalo Wild Wings (hence the "nickname"), the color orange, Paw Patrol and his big brothers and sister. He also has limited mobility due to a catastrophic brain injury from birth but let me tell you, NOTHING slows this kid down! I had the super cool opportunity to meet my WingMan and his extraordinary family while at the Indianapolis Marathon in November 2014...I can honestly say it was one of the best experiences ever to see his happy smile and to get one of his signature Big Hug Squeezes! We laughed and sang, he wowed me with his mad spelling skills, we even "raced" his siblings up and down the sidewalk with me pushing him in his chair, and he showed me all of his favorite things at the Children's Museum. Nick has been able to participate in a lot of accessible sports in his home area, thanks to donations to and sponsors of programs just like VT Adaptive. I am proud to be fundraising for such a fantastic cause...and stoked to know that I can help make a difference in the lives of people like my WingMan. One last note about my buddy...last year I also fundraised for this cause...and my WingMan even donated so that other kids could have the same opportunities he has...how awesome is this kid?!?!?!

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!

Leah Christensen
https://www.pledgereg.com/90898
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. Pushing myself to the limit of completing a 100 mile endurance race is an incredible experience. However, there are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!
https://www.pledgereg.com/90015

Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!

https://www.pledgereg.com/90016

In July 2016, I am running the Vermont 100. For those of you who don’t know, that is a 100 mile race through the hills and mountains of Southern Vermont. I know what you are thinking, “100 miles?!?! That’s crazy!!!” or maybe even, “Chris, you are an idiot.” But for those of you who know me, I am always up for a challenge.

And why make a 100 miler any easier than it has to be? I am running as a charity runner. The Vermont 100 raises money for the Vermont Adaptive Ski and Spots program. This is an amazing program that provides recreational and sports opportunities to people with disabilities. I love any program that can help anyone more fully enjoy the outdoors! I first heard of Adaptive programs when I lived in Colorado. I watched as the program taught anyone--from a child with a disability to a wounded veteran--learn to ski and snowboard. I was always impressed with the programs ability to bring outdoor opportunities to life for everyone. I was beyond excited when I learned there was an adaptive sports program in Vermont. And I am wicked excited to be able to help them raise money so they can continue sharing the love of sport with everyone!

So what you can do to help me: 1) want to run a few training miles with me? AWESOME. 2) You want to be charitable and make a donation to a great cause? EVEN BETTER! 3) You want to watch me attempt a 100 miler? Put some money in and I’ll make it happen! Every bit helps!

Vermont Adaptive is a cause that I fully believe in and support (if you keep reading below, I think you’ll see why). I am backing it with my own financial contribution as well as by running this race. I hope you will support me in this endeavor!

If you have any questions, please let me know! chris.g.eaton@gmail.com


Katie Eshleman
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!

 

Neely Fortune
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!

Erik Glover
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!

E David Granum
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!



Matt Klein
https://www.pledgereg.com/90584

Before I get into the “why” let me just express my gratitude that you’re on this page.

This July I’m going to be competing in the Vermont 100 mile ultra-running marathon and I could use some help. As many of you know, running is something that I'm incredibly passionate about as it's helped to change my life for the better. It's also provided me the ability to help others through my blood, sweat and tears.

Here’s the why - When I reflect on how I got to this point, there are clearly moments that are “life altering” as I like to say. There’s the obvious – like relationships and children – and then there are some that are not so clear at first glance. For me, the Vermont 100 is one of those moments (actually, more like 24+ hours of moments strung together ;-)

I first participated in this race in 2014. The race itself, and what the body and mind go through over a day’s worth of straight running, is hard to define and articulate. But more so, I was incredibly moved and humbled by Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports - a non-profit organization dedicated to providing access to recreational and competitive athletic training, equipment and support for individuals of all ages who have disabilities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive’s biggest fund raisers. Without race participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horseback riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

Today I'm grateful to have the ability to even attempt to run 100 miles. It's not lost on me that there are people out there for whom simply walking can be a challenge. Please consider donating what you can to help Vermont Adaptive continue to provide youth and adults with disabilities a measure of self-confidence and independence through adaptive sports programs and activities.

Thanks for any help you can provide.


Ryan Kunz
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!
https://www.pledgereg.com/90644

Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, there are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. Some people need a little extra assistance to pursue challenges that bring health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. Their programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to both help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal!
Thank you!


Keith McWilliams
I am fundraising for Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports program. I find this program to be near and dear to my heart because I have a child with disabilities. As a disabled veteran myself, I also know several veterans who's committed selfless service has led to a disability.

If I could take a few minutes of your time to share with you some information about the event I would truly appreciate your consideration for a donation.

As you may know I have been active in endurance events for many years now. The running and triathlon community has done so much to help me. Which made me realize it's time I do something more than just pay an entry fee. I was fortunate to find an event that I'm not only interested in but is also supporting a very worthy cause. I have challenged myself to compete in a 100 mile endurance run next summer.
 This will test every aspect of my physical and mental ability. The Vermont 100 uses the proceeds from it's event to support the Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports program. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. I take for granted every day my ability to even consider participating in a running event. There are many who will never have such an opportunity. This program will help them to build self-confidence and independence as an individual through adaptive sports.

I watched my disabled son Patrick smile from ear to ear when he participated in an adaptive program. Patrick suffered a traumatic brain injury which has led to limited use of his right arm and leg. He also has restricted vision and is unable to speak. However, despite his disabilities, he was able to ski down a mountain with the help of adaptive devices and truly passionate volunteers. I would love others to feel such a boost in confidence as well.

I understand it's difficult to reach in your pocket and contribute money. However I ask that you consider those who could benefit from your donation. Any amount at all would be greatly appreciated.
I have a goal of raising at least $6,000 however I'm confident with your help I can far exceed that.



Claude Parent
Competing in the VT 100 is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too! Thank you!

https://www.pledgereg.com/91561

Thanks for finding this page and considering making a donation towards my fundraising goals. For those of you who do know me, you know I love a challenge. More than that, you know I love finding creative ways to help the communities around me. I've been living in New England/Vermont since last spring and have really enjoyed exploring the trails out here. It's definitely a change from the deserts of Arizona. There are roots and rocks and ticks in the summer, then in fall they all try to hide under the beautiful blanket of leaves, and now there is snow (in some places, though not much this year!!). It's really a beautiful place, and what better way to experience that beauty than running 50 or 100 miles through it all, right?

Last summer I knew I wasn't ready for the VT100, so I volunteered at two different aid stations with my buddy Nelson. One of the things I love about the ultra community is being an active part of it both as a runner and as a volunteer. I continued to push myself and, with Nelson's suggestion, set my sights on training for the Vermont 50miler. I was fortunate enough to run the Vermont 50miler in October, both for myself and as a way to honor our friend Chad Denning, who was an incredible human and athlete who we lost too soon. It was through the VT50 that I learned about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports and all of the amazing things they do. Both the Vermont 50 and Vermont 100 donate all of their proceeds to VASS and help keep their programs running. And VASS gives back to these events too, their aid station I ran through on the VT50 was full of great people! So, I want to give back to VASS. While I'd love to volunteer time with their adaptive ski programs...I'm terrible on skis, so that's not much of an option. So here I am, running 100 miles through the woods of Central Vermont this July, to raise money for Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports.

I promise to run with a smile on my face, and when it turns to a grimace, I'll remind myself of all the things there are to smile about, and how generosity helped me get here. I'll keep y'all posted on my training progress and the things I'm excited about. The first big training milestone will be my successful running of the Zane Grey 50 miler on April 23, back home on the Mogollon Rim where I have so many incredible memories.

Thanks so much!!
peace -scout


Faith Raymond


https://www.pledgereg.com/91026


Competing in the VT 100k is a challenge that I look forward to meeting this summer. While I have spent hours, days, months and even years training for this event, it is something that I have been passionate about. There are people out there for whom just getting out to walk can be a challenge. People who need a little extra assistance to meet the challenge that brings health, fun and passion to their lives. Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you!



Mark Ryder
https://www.pledgereg.com/90143

Competing in the VT 100 is a goal I have had for the past couple years. It is a challange I am eagerly awaiting. There are others for whom the challenge is just being able to get out to the recreation area, let alone participate. So after seeing so many of my friends use their running to fund raise for worthy causes I've decided it time for me to put all these miles to good use.

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is such an organization. It provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

My fund raising goal is ambitious, I thought of settling for a minimal goal but decided if I'm going to do it I might as well put as much effort into it as I do my training.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!

Sorry I couldn't et this out there sooner for yesterdays Giving Tuesday, but I know between now and June 1 we can get meet that goal.
Thank you for your support!


Jeffrey Stauch
https://www.pledgereg.com/90152
This summer, I will be going out for my second attempt at the Vermont 100 Miler. I look forward to the challenge, and will be spending the winter, spring and early summer of 2016 training for the big event. As you know, running has become a big part of my life, and completing the VT100 is a goal I have had for some time.

I'm very fortunate to be able to train for this event - there are people out there for whom just getting out to go for a walk can be a challenge. There are folks who need some extra assistance to partake in activities that bring health, fun, and passion to their lives.

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports provides sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. They’re programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more in the warmer months.

The VT100 is a fundraiser for Vermont Adaptive, and this year, I'm a charity runner. I am aiming to raise a minimum of $1,000 ($10 for every mile!) to support the many great activities and programs organized by Vermont Adaptive. You'll see a number of different giving levels and the impact you can have through your philanthropy. I hope that you will give as generously as you are able to support this wonderful organization.

Thanks!!
Jeff, aka the Hat Guy
https://www.pledgereg.com/97731
I am running in the VT 100 miler. I want to run for a real purpose besides my self. I am fundraising for Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports. They provide sports and recreational programs as well as wellness and environmental retreats to people with disabilities. Their programs are offered to people of all ages, with a variety of disabilities. Programs include skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and Nordic in the winter; and sailing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, cycling, rock climbing, horseback riding, and more.

Please consider donating what you can to help me reach my goal and help Vermont Adaptive meet their goal too!
Thank you! 


Team Wingman



Team Ponyboi Express
Team Captain-Scout Phillips 
https://www.pledgereg.com/91561
The Vermont 100 Endurance Race is in its 28th year and was started by the same woman, Laura Farrell, who founded Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports. The VT 100 is put on every year by a committee of 15 dedicated volunteers who work year round, 250 volunteers who come out for race weekend, more than 30 private land owners and many donors of funds, products or services. Monies raised from the event support the year-round programs offered by Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports.

The course is a "shamrock" loop, consisting of 70% dirt or jeep roads with the rest on woods trails with just a couple miles of pavement. The course both climbs and descends 14,000 – 15,000 feet. Participants have 30 hours to complete the race and many strive to finish in less than 24 hours. In 2008 we added a 100 K course that uses almost all of the same trail, just cutting out the first of the shamrocks leaves.

All 100 Mile participants must have completed a 50 mile race in 12 hours or less to qualify and everyone is required to volunteer for 8 hours at a running event or trail work to enter.



SIX03 Endurance
If you haven't heard, a group of us from SIX03 Endurance—Tom Hooper, Mick Arsenault, Chris Straub, Jessica Goldman, Tony Bargardo, and I—are heading back to the Vermont 100 this July. And again, we're teaming up to accomplish two BIG things that we’re going to need your help to do!
Complete a 100-mile (and for Chris, 100-kilometer) footrace in Vermont on July 16th, and;
Raise $2,000+ in the process, all to benefit a GREAT cause: Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports, a program providing access to recreational and competitive athletic support for people who have disabilities. (Lots to read here, but DONATIONS CAN BE MADE AT THE TOP OF THIS PAGE, with the added challenge to raise at least $200 in the month of May!).


Last year, we made the same effort and with support like yours, we brought in just a little more than the $1,000 goal. This was an amazing outcome and we're hoping to repeat the success.

Of course, we know you cannot personally log training miles for us (if only!), but like last year, you can bring us closer to our fundraising goal.

So, here’s a little more about what we’ll be doing and why we would love your support to pull it off:

The event is called the Vermont 100 Endurance Run, or VT100, more affectionately, and it is one of the original 100-mile runs in the US and part of the Grand Slam Series of Ultrarunning.

Yes, you read the correctly: One hundred miles! But like the Boston Marathon, not just anyone can compete in this grueling event. You have to qualify, and in this case, by running either a 50-mile or 100-kilometer sanctioned event in under a designated time limit.

Mick, Tom, Jessica, and I have all qualified for this 100-mile event, while Chris will be taking his first stab at the 100-kilometer race portion that the VT100 offers. But from most experienced (Mick, a former 10th place overall finished in the 2015 100-mile VT100) to the least, attempting an all-out, one-day ultra like the VT100 is going to be more than a challenge for everyone involved. So all of us are going to be working equally hard to wind our way through Vermont’s beautiful (read: hilly!) dirt roads and back country trails.

But our primary goal is not necessarily just to finish or place in the 100-mile and 100-kilomter events.

Our biggest motivation leading into this race is to test our personal limits and to raise funds and awareness for Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports in the process.

This will mean training hard, long, and smart in order to toe the start line healthy and to finish the race uninjured.

But Why Vermont Adaptive, You Ask?

It’s simple: The same woman who started the now historic VT100 was also the founder of Vermont Adaptive. And for the past 28 years, every penny raised by the the VT100 has worked to fund this program and to celebrate its core values of mobility and the freedom that movement offers each and every one of us.

Personally, I don’t think any of us in SIX03 could imagine not having sports as an outlet and a therapy; as an avenue to find peace; to grow; and to develop. In fact, this type of attitude is partly why Tom founded our running club, SIX03 Endurance, because he knows well that recreation and community are hugely important to happiness.

Programs like Vermont Adaptive profoundly remind us that our bodies are a gift and that it is important that we give back when we can—because for some, just getting out to walk can be a challenge. However, with a little extra assistance, movement, sports, and recreation are not out of reach.

So, when the VT100’s race director challenged all of its participants to also go out and raise money for Vermont Adaptive, it was a no-brainer to us—we had to try!

This year, our hope is again that by attempting this 100-mile and 100-kilometer endurance challenge, we can also inspire you to help sponsor more than our journey. Whether this is the best or worst race of our lives, we will be happy enough knowing that our participation and your support positively impacted and improved the everyday lives of others.

Will you help us pull through this massive undertaking and make a real difference? Everything helps, and donating what you can will not only bring us closer to our own fundraising goal, you will also bring Vermont Adaptive closer to their goals too!

Thank you. We wouldn’t be where we are today—feeling supported to take on this challenge—if it weren't for you!

Alex, Tom, Mick, Chris, Jessica, and Tony




Charity Runners for 2015



We asked our Charity Runners a few questions about themselves and why they chose to fund raise for Vermont Adaptive...
Meet our runners-In their own words

 Matt Klein
How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?  
I’ve been running ultras for a few years now. Before I started running, I was the poster boy for anyone looking to go to the grave early. I had an addictive personality and was selfish and selfcentered. That all changed when my life blew up and I found myself handcuffed to a hospital bed. When I got out and on my feet, I was told that idle hands were the devil’s playground. To that end, I got lucky with an entry into the 2006 NYC marathon and my path towards ultras began. I loved everything about that first race. Which led to more marathons. And those led to half ironman triathlons, which led to full ironman tris, which lead to 50Ks and 60Ks and then 100Ks. After that I put my sights on a 100 miler. And then another. And then another…. 
The best is having a bucket list of races that I can work toward over a lifetime.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?

There’s nothing I like more than helping others through running – something I absolutely love to do. It’s my Zen. My meditation. Everything comes out on the run. All of life’s problems seem to solve themselves on the long run. When I learned there were charity spots available, and that I could help the organization that really made an impression on me at last year’s event, it was an easy decision to sign up.

Also, last year a woman and child that benefitted from VA spoke at the Friday afternoon meeting under the tent. It was moving and gave me an incredible sense of gratitude to be a part of something so obviously epic.

What also left a deep impression on me was some of the VA folks were BBQ’ing at one of the aid stations on the back half of the race. I might have been 60 or so miles into it. Not exactly sure. They were all having fun and laughing. I can’t tell you what was said to me because I don’t remember. But what I do remember is the great vibe they left me with that carried me toward the end of the race. I often think back to that.  By fundraising, I can help those folks, just as they helped me.

What are your favorite and least favorite aspects to a 100 miler?
Starting with the favorites, it’s the reason I’m coming back to this race – the VOLUNTEERS ARE AWESOME. This race and everybody involved are the best. Volunteers and the race director are what keep people coming back. And the community of ultra-runners that were up here last year were kind and giving of their time and wisdom. It’s the stuff that will bring tears to your eyes if you think on it long enough. Tears of gratitude to have the ability to participate in something so special.

My least favorite aspects - I don’t necessarily like when my stomach goes sour. Which has inevitably happened on every race. Although this year I’m going to try and different approach and see what happens.

I’m a slow and steady guy so that 3 am time frame can be trying also. I’m talking about those moments where I’m begging for the sun to come back. I’m scanning the horizon for any lightening of the sky.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations? Is there a go-to fuel or drink you have? Is it the volunteers? Something else?
I love the variation in the aid stations. But my favorite for food has to be the grand cookie selection at one of the stations. Not quite sure which one. But I’m going to be on the lookout. And I plan on eating more this time around J

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
My advice is pick a race and work toward it. It’s really that simple. You may want to start with a 50k and work your way up. Or you can just shoot the moon and go for the big 100. Either way, make sure you like the training aspect.

I’ve also adopted the idea that every run and race is a lesson of what works and what doesn’t work. And more shall be revealed. You could read all the race reports you want, but until you go out and start putting one foot in front of the other, you’re really not going to understand what is waiting for you.

But I do believe if I can do it, anyone can. Now some people around me have argued that point. But I truly believe if you want it bad enough, you can go out and get it. The discipline of training for this distance spills into all my affairs. I really think it makes me a better son, husband, father, worker and friend. The sense of accomplishment of completing a race like this is unmatched. There’s no parallel. And that’s something that no one can ever take away. It’s with you for life!


Celia Leber

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
My first trail marathon was around 1990 - I had run a lot of shorter trail races and some road marathons at that point and wanted to try a longer trail race. After that I ran a bunch of trail races in the 20-26 mile range in the early 90's, then ran my first 50 miler in 1999 (the Vermont 50). I finished that one just over the official time limit. I ran a bunch of trail ultras, from 50K to 100 miles, from 2000 to 2005, mostly in New England, with a few in CA and OR. Then I took a break for a few years to focus more on cycling, in part due to plantar fasciitis issues. According to UltraSignup I've done 36 ultras, but I think it's probably closer to 40-45 since a few didn't get on there.
Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
When I crossed the line last year, an old friend who was at the finish said "gee, I think 24 hours is within your grasp!" So although I had been thinking about trying a different 100 miler I decided to come back to Vermont and try for a buckle. And I love the race!

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
I have tremendous loyalty and affection for VASS. My husband and I have been taking part, either running or biking, in the Vermont 50 since shortly after we got married (I think we have done it something like 14 times?) Some of my happiest hours have been spent on the VT50 or VT100 course. Mike Silverman is great, the volunteers are great -- I feel like it's a big extended family. So, VASS is a great cause that does good work, but I think for me it's more a matter of wanting to pay back for all that the VASS events have meant to me over the years.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations?
Probably seeing my crew - my friends Beth and Doug took such good care of me last year. And I like having chicken soup at the aid stations at night. Oh, and Coke - ultras are really the only time I drink soda at all, but during the race I will swig down a lot of Coke and ginger ale.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon?
 The first time I ran the VT50 with my best friend Penny, we were at the back of the pack at about 40 miles, when we passed a parked pick up truck with some hunters sitting in the truck bed. "Want a beer, ladies?" We looked at each other, pondering the question. "All those folks may be ahead of you, but if you have a beer now then at the finish you'll know you're one ahead of them!" We all laughed at that one, and Penny and I happily shared a bottle of Michelob as we continued on up the road.

Chip Paterson

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
I ran my first ultra in 2008- it was the 50k at the VT50. It was actually sort of an accident. I had biked the VT50 for a number of years and talked a few co-workers into signing up. Unfortunately I spaced out and missed the sign up myself. These co-workers weren’t very happy about that and told me I better start running because they were going to make me go and run the 50k. Up to that point the longest run I had ever been on was about 12 miles. Since then I have run a number of 50ks, 50 milers and other assorted races.

Have you run the Vermont 100 before? If yes, when?
I started in 2010 but dropped at 75 miles for no good reason. I finished VT100 in 2011 and again in 2013.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
I’d like to have a more confident finish, and am hopeful for sub 24-hour. I hope I didn’t just jinx myself by saying that out loud.

How is training going so far this year?
It’s going well. I feel stronger at this point than in past years I think.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
I first learned of VASS when I rode my first VT50 in 2003. I am thrilled to be giving something more back to the organization this year for the opportunity to participate in the VT100 and would like to volunteer with VASS in the future.


Jeff Whittingham

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
This is my second year running ultra distances (and 2nd year running since college xc 18yrs ago). However, I’ve been doing ultra distance mountain bike races for nearly 15 years, with fairly good results (a number of podium finishes at solo 24hr races, some top 10’s at 100 milers (NUE Series races), won the VT50, etc.

A few years ago they started a marathon in my town (the Mad Marathon) and it seemed fitting to give it a go as it meanders past my house. I did well enough to qualify for Boston, then that fall ran the VT50 in a respectable time (around 8hrs). I then decided to give a 100 a go as I really enjoy ultra distance efforts and doing 100 miles by foot has an allure that I can’t shake.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
I’m a Vermonter and have done the VT50 7-8 times by bike and once by foot. I love the course and that the event 100% supports VT Adaptive. Living in the Mad River Valley I’ve found both the volunteers and athletes participating in VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring, much more so than us silly folks running or riding all day.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
For similar reasons that drove me to choose the VT100 as my first ultra. I find the volunteers and athletes of VT Adaptive to be truly inspiring. I’ve probably done 50 ultra distance events over the past 15 years and they’ve always been for selfish reasons. For me, 100 miles is a challenge unlike any other. Riding for 24 hours was hard, but you glide down hill, in running there is no respite. In thinking about this challenge, I wanted to do it for more than myself – a true testament to the human spirit – and the courage of those for whom just getting outside is a true challenge.

What is your fundraising goal?
It was originally $1000, but once I crossed that barrier I upped it to $2000. I have a few hundred to go and am looking to do at least one more fundraising push before the race in order to get there (or close to it).

What is your incentive for fundraising and what strategies have worked so far in raising money?
The incentive is seeing VT Adaptive in action at Mt Ellen and how much equipment is required to get some folks out there on the slopes – and realizing this is just one sport VT Adaptive is engaged in.


Adolfo Munguia Castilla

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)?
I have been running ultra’s for a couple years. I have attempted and finished 6 ultra’s: Cayuga Trails 50 mile, Finger Lakes 50 mile, GLER 100k, NYRR 60k (twice), and the North Face Endurance Challenge at Bear Mt. in NY. Hopefully it’s the beginning of many years and races ahead of me.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal?
It was relatively close to get to, I have heard many great things about the race, and it’s in the summer time. Also, in terms of dreams, it a qualifier for the Western States…

How is training going so far this year?
It’s been strange. I got a part in Creative Time’s art project in Central Park, and every weekend was pretending to be Dustin Hoffman in The Marathon Man from 12-6. Got a lot of miles in, but pretty flat.
What are your favorite and least favorite aspects to a 100 miler?
Ask me after the race… this is my first time attempting 100 miles!

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
Have fun. Don’t think, just run. At some point you’re going to finish, don’t worry about it. It’s just a few hours of your life.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon?
So many. Every race is a great experience with crazy adventures attached. But probably Cayuga Trails 50 – because it was my first race, first time ever on a trail, in a mountain, and I had no idea about the vertical map of the race. Everything was a beautiful difficult surprise.


Lucimar Araujo

How did you get involved with ultra running?
I actually ran an ultra marathon before I ran a marathon! I wanted to run the New York City Marathon but couldn't get in, so to prove that I could do it, I ran an ultra. At that point I had only run up to 18 miles. I ran two ultras before finally running the New York City Marathon. I don't remember exactly how many I have done, but I have kept all of my race numbers and made a skirt out of them.

You've chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment?
My father was a very giving person and I want to follow in his footsteps. He gave back to the community; that is his legacy. I raised money in my first 5k and continue to do so because of him. It makes me feel good to do something like he would do.

What is your fundraising goal?
I believe sports are for everyone and so I've reached out to friends and family to help me while I raise money. I use the letter on my fundraising page. When I got to $1000, I tried for $1500. When I got there, I tried for $2000, and now I'll try for $2500. We'll see how much I can raise!

What are your favorite aspects of the VT 100?
The whole community stops and supports the event. It is beautiful! The hills are a way to challenge myself (even if I don't like hills!).

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running?
Listen you your body. I encourage all people to run. I love when people who think I'm crazy and then they start and love it. The way I run may motivate someone. People tell me, "I love to see your pictures because you look so happy" and I tell them that anything I can do, you can do better.


Mike Rafferty

How long have you been running ultramarathons and how many have you done (attempted, completed – whatever you want to tell us!)? I’m a relative “newbie” to the world of ultrarunning. My first attempt at anything longer than a 5k or 10k was the LA Marathon in 2011. About one year after completing that, I entered my first 50k, which was the Leona Divide 50k in Lake Hughes, CA. The experience was great, and I knew that I wanted to keep pushing the distance to see how far I could go. This lead to me signing up and completing the North Face Endurance Challenge 50M in San Francisco, which took place in December of that year. Wanting to give the distance a second try, I signed up for TNF50 again the following year, which then gave me my qualifying race for what would be my first 100 mile attempt…The Angeles Crest 100. AC is one of the harder 100 miles, and it was certainly a worthy challenge for my first attempt. So, in August of 2014, I toed the line and set out to what would be one of the best experiences in my running career. 27:35 later, I crossed the finish line in Alta Dena and received my first buckle. I love the distance, challenge, and experience of the 100 mile race, and look forward to running again in Vermont.

Have you run the Vermont 100 before? If yes, when? This will be my first attempt at Vermont, and literally the first trail race I’ve ever done on the East Coast, even though I grew up and spent 21 years there.

Why did you make this year’s VT 100 your goal? I knew that I wanted to put a 100 mile race on the calendar each year, since running my first in ’14. Rather than attempt another run on the same terrain I train on year round, I thought that heading back East and running in NE would be a great change of scenery for me. Also, being one of the original 100 mile races adds a great element to the overall experience, and I hope to complete the “original” races over the years.

How is training going so far this year? Training this year is as good as it can be. My wife and I work full time and commute to work, and we also have two small children. This schedule doesn’t allow for the “full” training that I could entail, so most of my weekly efforts are done on the road/trail at 4:15-4:30am. I feel that the early hour running in the dark certainly helps when forced to run with a headlamp in longer distance races, and the sleep deprivation doesn’t hurt either. Each year, I set aside two or three weekends where I dedicate my time for the 20+ mile back to back runs. I feel this year, as opposed to last, the efforts were equally as good (although I wasn’t training at altitude and my vertical gain wasn’t as much) and my recovery was far better. My weekly mileage has been averaging around 55 miles, with my longest week at 78, which is only a few miles longer than my longest training run for AC. I’m a middle pack runner, and feel that moderate mileage works best for me, as I’m also 200lbs + and don’t feel the high mileage (90-100) is in my best interest. I have the usual aches and pains, but my taper has been good so far.

You’ve chosen to raise money for Vermont Adaptive as a charity runner. What drove you to make this commitment? I had my first experience with a charity at the Boston Marathon in ’14. Although I wasn’t part of the charity team, I saw the impact these people had and the fun they had going through the training/race. Running is a passion of mine, and one that I don’t take for granted. Seeing that Vermont had a charity option, I felt it was the perfect opportunity to raise money doing something that I love, and especially for a charity group such as the Vermont Adaptive. Traveling from out of state, I felt it was even more important to give back to the community that I would be making myself a part of the weekend of the race. It feels great to do a small part for such a great organization.

What is your fundraising goal? I only have about 3 weeks left, but ideally I would like to raise $2,000 plus. I’m motivated to make this happen.

What is your incentive for fundraising and what strategies have worked so far in raising money? The incentive for fundraising is being able to better someone else’s well being through exercise and activity. I know how much it means to me, and to allow that gift to someone else is all I can ask. My main method of fundraising has been through Facebook. Most of the donations have been made through the posts I’ve put up, with a small handful via word of mouth.

What are your favorite and least favorite aspects to a 100 miler? Having only completed one, I’m sure this will change but here are my initial thoughts. My favorite aspect is the feeling of accomplishment. Being able to do something that most people can do, yet don’t have the courage to try. It tests my mental strength, and leaves me with a feeling that anything is possible. Of course, the energy levels at the aid stations, as well as the volunteers that keep you energized are up there as well. My least favorite aspect is the “unknown” that you didn’t plan on. You can sort your hydration, nutrition, gear, etc, but you can never plan on the blister that you never had before, the “irritation” that never showed up on a long training run, etc. This distance pushes you further past the norm, and you have to expect the unexpected.

What is the one thing you are looking forward to at the aid stations? Is there a go-to fuel or drink you have? Is it the volunteers? Something else? As stated above, the volunteers are what really help bring this all together. I’ve never participated in a trail race that didn’t have the best people out there backing you up. It’s a community unlike none other. I’m an avid Tailwind user, and was more than happy to hear the news that this is the go to drink choice on the course. I can’t say enough about the product. I literally use only tailwind on most training and shorter races. In AC I finally started eating at mile 45, but was Tailwind up until that point. Huge partnership for the race.

What advice would you give to someone who is just getting started with ultra running? Take your time and be patient. Odd are, you are going to be out there for a long, long time. I found out the hard way that starting off fast in an ultra will have horrible effects later on. Take your time at aid stations, smile, and enjoy the surroundings…cause you’ll be there for awhile. Lastly, if you have a family, know that the amount of training you do will end up being as hard on you as it will be for them. They will make major sacrifices to ensure that you are able to accomplish your goals. Keep that in mind, as its only running, and they are the things that are most important in life. If you haven’t found that balance yet, figure it out sooner than later.

What is your favorite memory/experience from an ultramarathon? Seeing my family at mile 38 on the AC 100 course after a long, bonk filled climb up out of the canyon. Mentally I was down, and seeing my wife and two boys standing there immediately took me out of my funk and brought new energy to my race.



Here is a little bit about Vermont Adaptive

Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing recreational and competitive sports opportunities to people with disabilities. We believe sports and recreation provide a physical, mental and social experience that is immeasurable in promoting self-confidence and independence in an individual.

With nearly 400 active volunteers instructing and helping, plus generous partners and sponsors, and an amazing base of clients and friends, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports has been at the forefront of sports and recreation for those with disabilities in New England for more than 20 years. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports is committed to empowering individuals with disabilities. We promote independence and further equality through access and instruction to sports and recreational activities.

The VT 100 is one of Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports biggest fund raisers every year. Without our participants, volunteers and sponsors, Vermont Adaptive would not be able to provide access to: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, hand cycling, tandem biking, horse back riding, rock climbing, hiking, camping and other adventure weekends to their participants!

For more information about Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports: www.vermontadaptive.org.

Here are just a few ways Vermont Adaptive puts a donation to work
  • $25 provides a 2 hour snowshoe or Nordic outing in the winter or a 2 hour canoe or kayak outing in the summer.
  • $40 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase a box of hand warmers for volunteer instructors and participants. 
  • $60 covers the cost of a ½ day of skiing or snowboarding including equipment. 
  • $100 covers a whole day of skiing or snowboarding in the winter or a therapeutic horse back lesson in the summer. (These allow us to provide scholarships to people who otherwise could not participate.) 
  • $500 allows Vermont Adaptive to purchase new helmets for one program location. 
  • $600 buys a new tandem bike. 
  • $600 buys a new kayak or canoe 
  • $1,000 outfits six Vermont Adaptive instructors with uniforms. 
  • $3,000 provides the resource to purchase a new or piece of sit down equipment such as a mono-ski or hand cycle. 

More info about our visit Our Top Fundraisers